DNS Lookup

5 Tips to Help You Get a Better Understanding of DNS Lookup

When you type a website into your browser, DNS lookup is how your browser knows how to get there. Behind the scenes, your computer is constantly making requests for information and sending it back in response. While this process might seem complicated and like something best left to geeks, the basic principles are relatively straightforward. If you’re reading this article, chances are you feel a bit confused about it. The truth is that DNS lookup can be rather confusing for newcomers because of all the different terminology involved. However, once you break it down, it’s not that difficult to understand. Read on to learn more about DNS lookup and why it’s so essential to your everyday browsing experience.

What is DNS?

DNS stands for Domain Name System. It is a system that links domain names (like google.com or nytimes.com) with IP addresses (like 216.58.207.99). If you’re an IT professional or work in the tech industry, the name DNS is probably familiar to you already. If not, don’t worry! This article will walk you through everything you need to know to understand this important technology. Keep in mind that DNS is not a single computer but a network of computers that are responsible for connecting domain names with IP addresses. Whenever you go to a website, you type in the domain name, and your computer uses DNS to look up its IP address and connect to it.

A Basic Explanation of DNS lookup

When you enter a web address, let’s say for example you want to visit Google.com, your computer first checks its local DNS server to see if it has the site information stored. If it does, it will check the computer’s cache and then display Google.com as you expect. If it does not find the information on the local computer, it will then send a query to a DNS server and ask it to provide the site information. Once the DNS server receives the request, it goes through a process to find the IP addresses of the site you are searching. Next, it will send this information back to your computer and boom! You have full access to Google.com.

How Does DNS Lookup Work?

When you enter a domain name into your browser, your computer will first check its local DNS server for the site information. If it does not find the information on the computer, it will then send a query to a DNS server and ask it to provide the site information. The DNS server then goes through a process to find the IP address(es) of the site you are searching. Next, it will send this information back to your computer and boom! You have full access to the website you were looking for. The DNS server is able to respond because it keeps a record of all the domain names and their corresponding IP addresses. This is the reason why you can type any domain name into your browser and have it immediately display. Since the server already knows the IP address, there’s no need for you to type it out.

Understanding the Request Process

When you type a website address into your browser, your computer will first check its local DNS server to see if it has the site information stored. If it does, it will check the cache and then display the website as you expect. If it does not find the information on the computer, it will then send a query to a DNS server and ask it to provide the site information. Once the DNS server receives the request, it goes through a process to find the IP addresses of the site you are searching. Next, it will send this information back to your computer and boom! You have full access to the site you were looking for. The DNS server is able to respond because it keeps a record of all the domain names and their corresponding IP addresses. This is the reason why you can type any domain name into your browser and have it immediately display. Since the server already knows the IP address, there’s no need for you to type it out.

Finding the IP Address(es) of a Website

What happens when you type a website address into your browser and nothing happens? This is usually because the website is either down or it has been removed from the internet. When you type a domain name into your browser and nothing happens, the first thing you should do is check if the site is up and running. You can do this by typing “ping” followed by the domain name. Let’s say for example you want to ping www.google.com. Simply type ping www.google.com into your browser and it will tell you if the site is up or not. If the website is up and running, you will see an IP address(es) displayed in your browser. The IP address is basically the website’s address and it will look something like this: 216.58.207.99. If the website has a .com at the end of its name, chances are it is hosted in the United States. The .com name is the top-level domain (TLD) of the United States. Similarly, if the website is hosted in the United Kingdom, it will end with .co.uk.

Why is DNS Lookup Important?

The most commonly asked question in relation to DNS is “Why can’t I just type in the IP address?” The answer to this question is simply that we don’t type IP addresses into our browser. We type domain names. DNS is basically a way of converting domain names into IP addresses. There are various advantages to using DNS to convert domain names into IP addresses. First of all, it makes browsing the internet much easier as you don’t have to remember IP addresses of every website you visit. Secondly, it helps to keep your computer safe from different malicious attacks. Whenever you type a domain name, your computer automatically looks up the IP address for you. If someone else tried to enter this name, their computer would get the IP address from the DNS server and not yours.

Confused About DNS? Know These Words!

If you’ve read this far, you’re probably starting to understand how DNS lookup works. However, you may be feeling a bit overwhelmed by all the new terminology you have learned along the way. Don’t worry! It’s completely understandable. Here are some key terms that you should know to help you better understand DNS lookup: - Query: This refers to a request sent to the DNS server asking it to provide the IP address of the site you’re searching. - Request: This is the actual message sent to the DNS server asking it to find the IP address of the website you are searching. - Response: This is the message sent back to your computer containing the IP address of the website you typed in. - Cache: This is a section on your computer that stores website information for future use. - Domain name: This refers to the website address you type into your browser. - IP address: This is the unique number that identifies each device on the internet. - Top-level domain (TLD): This refers to the last section of the domain name after the “.”

Tips to Help You Understand DNS Lookup Better

Keep an eye on your IP address. If you’re using a computer to browse the internet, you can find out what your IP address is by typing “what is my IP address” into your browser. If you’re using a smartphone or tablet, you can check your IP address by visiting a website such as What is my IP address. - Invest in a quality DNS service. The default DNS servers provided by your internet service provider aren’t always the best. In fact, they’re often slow and unreliable. This can result in your website loading slowly, or it may even prevent it from loading completely. - Educate yourself on how DNS works. The more you understand about how DNS works, the better equipped you will be to troubleshoot any issues that arise.

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